Sunday, November 21, 2004

French atrocity

Okay, on the one hand you have a US soldier shooting a wounded terrorist, who was faking dead, in the course of a larger struggle to liberate Fallujah.

On the other hand, you have French soldiers shooting indiscriminately at unarmed civilians in the course of a larger struggle to reassert colonialist ties over the Ivory Coast.

Warning, the video at the link contains some EXTREMELY graphic scenes. Abu Ghraib and the shooting of the wounded terrorist were nothing compared to this French massacre, which should rightly earn the appellation “atrocity.”

This massacre throws into sharp contrast the moral superiority of Americans from most other countries of the world. I simply cannot picture our troops shooting into a crowd of unarmed, nonbelligerent citizens and then leaving them to die. Maybe it’s the dreaded religiosity of America that makes her soldiers conduct themselves at such high levels, maybe its our appreciation and imitation of our forefathers who conducted themselves with honor and quested for freedom in their lives. Either way, even among Western-style democracies, American exceptionalism is apparent and, I think, one of the reasons why Kerry bled many voters from his ranks. No one cares what the hell France thinks, and Kerry’s belief that America’s actions need to be tempered with world opinion was, and is, a hideous thing to most Americans. What the world thinks does not define the morality of America’s actions.

And thank God that it doesn't, because if it did then we would not be seeing such an unprecedented spread of human freedom throughout the Middle East, led by a simple but pious man, strong in his convictions, undeterred by the currents of international disapprobation. Instead we would have a Chomskyesque vision of America humbled before two-bit dictatorships, handing sovereignty over piece by piece to the morally bankrupt Eurocrats of the UN, afraid to exert even the slightest influence for fear of being called a “bully.”

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